It was so awesome to speak with the Condreay brothers. For me, growing up in Southern California and listening to them talk about all the amusement parks and rides they worked on was like revisiting my childhood. I can see why they and their families are so proud of the work they’ve done. I truly hope you enjoyed the episode as much I did interviewing them.

Check out what our company does: www.laytonconstruction.com

You can also view the video podcast here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oa_KqESEXRw

 

Episode Transcript:

Forrest Cole
Welcome to Laying The Groundwork. A Layton Construction podcast. I am your host Forrest Cole. This is Daniel Condreay, Senior Project Manager for Layton.

Daniel Condreay
There was one thing I learned from my dad or at an early age was that work ethic and get the job done. Get it done right.

Forrest Cole
I was super excited to speak with the Condreay brothers because they’ve been in construction since they were young boys working alongside their father, building many iconic parts of southern California, who also love how their family construction story resembles that of Layton construction. This is David, Senior Superintendent.

David Condreay
Here at Layton Construction, I feel like we are part of a family and we’re working for a family no different than what we grew up with working for my dad.

Forrest Cole
As you can see their family history, like Layton’s is built upon working with integrity. So please lay back and enjoy this episode.

Gentlemen, thank you so much for joining me today. First I’d like to talk about I know that construction is very deep in your family history. I know that your grandfather was in construction, I know that your father was in construction. And I know that you both worked with your father. And I know that your father worked on some really cool projects here in California. And I’d like to wonder if you could share some stories about about your time working with your dad and started.

David Condreay
Sure. Yeah, my dad was born in Colorado. My grandpa was a general contractor back in Colorado, he had his own construction business welding company back there then. And then my dad, he was a general contractor worked in San Fernando Valley, Southern California area doing, you know, various jobs and everything else.

Daniel Condreay
Second generation construction and in Southern California and, you know, third and in the family, our father, while we had the privilege of growing up with him and on the job sites to both Dave and I had the same upbringing. Where as a early age, rather than on Christmas break and Easter break and summer break, rather than goof around too much. We go to work with her dad, and got a chance to see a lot of things at a young age, maybe more than some people see their whole careers, some of the projects early on. Well, one of the first ones that my dad did was Magic Mountain. He was working on Colossus up there, which was an interesting project in and of itself. There was a number of projects he did at Magic Mountain. Some of them are still there today. Some of them had been replaced with other rides and attractions and a lot of the fun projects he did. We got to experience early age to Knott’s Berry Farm Camp Snoopy, Indian trails, ton of projects up at Universal Studios. So we got to see a lot of interesting things not only in amusement parks, but a lot of different projects that were really unique. And at early age and Dave, and I got to experience a lot of that together with our dad and separately whether or the two, no, it was quite interesting, a lot of fun. Got to see a lot of things that he could pull a project together that was behind the table, step into it and make it happen and turn the schedule around and get it done. So a lot of things that people say couldn’t be done, he did.

Forrest Cole
How many years difference between the two of you

Daniel Condreay
five

David Condreay
five.

Forrest Cole
Dave you’re older.

David Condreay
Yeah.

Forrest Cole
Is that right? And so how old were you when you first started working with your dad?

David Condreay
I was about 12 when I started. He used to take me out every summer keeps giving gives out of trouble tickets to work you know. So via hottie hauling lumber in for the what was going on? He put me to work sweeping whatever had to get done as a laborer. I was doing it you know.

Forrest Cole
Now was that typical at the time to have young young men such as yourself out working on the job or where you’re sort of was that unique?

David Condreay
I didn’t see a lot many other you know, kids my age on the job site. It was mostly all adults. You know, journeyman carpenters and stuff like that. Utilize us as laborers the time was it like it was getting paid either more of an internship or free free internship.

Forrest Cole
Yeah.

Daniel Condreay
And I got benefited much the same to

Forrest Cole
Sure.

Daniel Condreay
In fact, you know, I’d help out and help the project engineers on the job right RFIs and go chase down the information. And like Dave said, a push in a room fact, the first paycheck, I got, the owner of the company came out there and seen me out there pushing a broom on the job site. Greg told my dad, he said, Jerry, if you’re going to have your son on the job site work and put them on the payroll, so he’s covered under the insurance. And that was my first paycheck. So push it up and work worked, you know, like crazy over there to get done with whatever needs to be done. But also, we had a lot of fun, too. So the museum parks over there, when I was up there with my dad, long about the time, badger mountain up there when the park opened. He looked at me, he’s telling me, it’s time for your coffee break. I looked him kind of puzzled the first time he says, Well, hey, the parks open up once you go see if you can sneak on line or for one of the roller coasters, go ride him and come back when you’re done. So I stuck over there. And before any of the crowds were on, I was able to jump on Colossus. Ride the front seat, and about three runs through. The guys over there finally told me Hey, there, we got somebody in line. So you have to jump out and take another seat. Give him an opportunity. Take the front seat. When my break time was up. I hustled back to the job site. Nice. Did you enjoy your coffee break you back to work?

Forrest Cole
That’s amazing. Yeah, I remember. I like I mean, I love we talked about this before. I mean, Colossus knowing this story about how I mean, Dave, you worked on Colossus. That’s Is that correct? Right. You worked on it with your dad.

David Condreay
work done? Yeah. It was basically doing creosote on the some of the wood boards over there.

Forrest Cole
Yeah, and so for, you know, for me, I’m, I mean, I’m younger than you. And, you know, maybe not that much younger, but I’m younger than you guys. And I remember. I mean, it’s the it was the largest wood roller coaster of its kind at the time. Is that correct?

Yep.

I remember go in when I was probably about eight years old. This was probably in the early 80s. And I remember they, they had these big buttons. That said, I rode Colossus. And I was I think I was just old enough to ride the rides, you know, you like, when you’re young you like, wait till your kids you skip past that line, you know, and, and my parents were like, well, you can’t have a button unless you ride the ride. And I was terrified, of course, you know. But I did it. I rode the ride. And, you know, when I was done, I wanted to be just like you, Dan, I wanted to just keep going and ride it and ride it and ride it. And I think my mom probably still has that button somewhere. But, you know, thinking about, you know, as that ride is important to my childhood, and I can only imagine how important that is to you to you guys. Right? And that idea like that you guys worked on it with your father. And but also these amusement parks, these rides are such an integral part of kind of Southern California, right? And you talk about Magic Mountain, Knott’s Berry Farm, some of these other places like what is that like to sort of have that likes to be a part of that, right to be a part of that like that specialness, you know.

David Condreay
Yeah.

Daniel Condreay
The projects that not only I worked on, but worked on with my father too. I just think of those pure fun. They’re just a joy to build. And, and it was fun to do it. And you’re thinking out of the box, like Indian trails. When my dad did that Dave was out there. And I was out there to you know, the, the design team was on site. And they sketch something up on eight and a half by 11, and hand it over to us and say go build it. So you’d have to go get the material and build it on site on a lot of different things out there on the site. There was other things that were designed and procured ahead of time that they shipped in, like all the hand homes cedar from Morgan for the lodge, the mystic lodge and Canoe House. But there was a lot of things that were just on the fly. And think back at it was interested in the weekends over there. The dad had all the superintendents from the company out on the job site on the weekends, helping them out because the fast paced job that had to be opened up quickly. And there’s one that stands out in my mind. Mike had come out there and asked my dad he says, Okay, what do you want me to do, Jerry? He says, Well He hands him a eight and a half by 11 sketch. And chain size is there’s a large pole over there. You’re making the totem pole. So the total poles that are out there in the front, Mike did, he carved all those with the chainsaw based on eight and a half by 11 sketch of what they wanted. And every time I come by Mike out there when he was working on it, he just looked like a kid in a candy store having fun. This guy’s a superintendent that had been a superintendent for you know, a decade out there but he’s on my dad’s job site just having fun.

David Condreay
It was artistic that’s why

Daniel Condreay
Yeah.

Forrest Cole
Yeah.

Daniel Condreay
Yeah.

Forrest Cole
that’s fun. You know, like and how wild that on a sketch off an eight and a half by 11 piece of paper, you know, that’d be That’s unheard that’d be unheard of today.

David Condreay
There was a water heater we had a water heater for the dredge board beans courthouse, we relocated from another part of the park and put it into a different part of the park and then moved the whole entire building and a water heater in the corner for the sarsaparilla stand they had to make make it go away. So we had to build barrels and out of wood and try to fabricate a half barrel to cover up the water heater assembly like a stack barrel assembly here. So that was that was kind of cool.

Forrest Cole
So that’s a project you that you also worked on that with your dad, the Indian Trails.

Daniel Condreay
He was a superintendent.

David Condreay
Yeah, I was a carpenter over there.

Forrest Cole
So cool. What other projects did you work on with your dad?

Daniel Condreay
Ninja.

David Condreay
Well, yeah, Ninja roller coaster that was 187 pile caps with the 65 to 80 foot deep caissons, four foot diameter, five foot diameter. And then the ride was just it was going up the side of a hillside type of situation. So there’s varying degrees of, of your cake of your columns that hold up the ride. It’s it’s basically stand up roller coaster assembly, did that one, it was built around existing rides and everything that was around the park. And then we had we had Universal Studios, I did a bunch of work over there on that one, it was we did the front entry main entry to the thing if you go to Universal now, there is if you come up Lankershim Boulevard, up to the front entry, there’s a parking garage, we worked in the parking garage, we did the front ticket booths area, and that’s enters the universal, that’s where you get your tickets at. And then there used to be a Tony Romos on one side and Victoria Station on the other side. We took both of those out. And then there’s a waterfall we put in there. It’s got a glass rock glass block fountain on it. And it’s got a set of stairs that goes up on the one side and a handicap ramp on the other side. We built all that in the if you go there now, you’ll still see the fountain says Universal Studios on it. It’s on all their pictures whenever they do anything on TV. See that thing is that sun front instrument entry. I built all that I don’t finish the concrete on that. I put in the brass. We’re a channel that’s in the front of the fountain so it actually sheds water off the front of it. So it’s kind of cool. You may actually see in that every time my kids point of Hey, Dad, there’s your thumb. You know?

Forrest Cole
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. I mean, it must be

Daniel Condreay
Yeah, the cast in place walls. Oh, there Dave was working with one carpenter. And that was my first experience to working with a different journeyman carpenter over there separately, and we were working on the walls, but my dad was always one to push the envelope with the schedule. So those walls were being put together, the forms buttoned up and the rebar finishing the same day you want to pour as he gets same day inspection. So he started pouring on one side of that radius wall while the other side was still getting buttoned up.

David Condreay
We got to get that thing open so fast for Universal because they wanted a certain date to get grand opening on it. We didn’t get the handrails for the, they called it the canyon remember that handicap ramp?

Oh yeah.

So we didn’t get the handrails fabricated time. So we ended up having to build everything out of PVC piping and use

Daniel Condreay
and foe it in and paint it.

David Condreay
Yeah, it passed the building inspector said it was okay. It was all PVC pipe.

PVC pipe and then galvanized receivers that were lagged into the wall. Then once the permanent handrail came in, that had to be removed off but they wanted to sandblast the wall. So I was out there on a night shift running the sandblasters.

Forrest Cole
Did the amusement parks often have like quick timetables?

David Condreay
Always Yes, always. It’s all dropped dead dates. You had a hit no matter what.

Forrest Cole
Yeah.

David Condreay
So if you couldn’t hit it, you have to figure out a way to hit it. Wow.

Daniel Condreay
The one last projects I got the privilege of working with my dad on was Universal Studios, backlot, Tran, and started on the project separately without them. And we got in there, the project itself was built as the operations building for the backlog, backlog tram, and it sat over the existing landfill. So basically a building on stilts, it sat on 26 caissons that went 114 feet in the ground through the landfill section, with a connecting bridge that tied into a project that my dad worked on, right off the Back to the Future up there on the top deck. But thread the needle was the bridge through the oak trees that were on the hillside. After we poured the case ons and all the grade beams in there, they figured out our layout for the bridge abutment on the far side encroached in the drip line of oak trees. So they had us rotate the building. And mind you, we already had the anchor bolts for the building already set in concrete, literally. So they rotated at three degrees, which meant we had to go modify all the steel, we went back and figured out that you know what the impact was and the delay and came back to MCA universal and said it’s about three month impact. We figured you know, to get all this field modified out here for all the steel because the steel was all shot fabricated and landed on the job. And we had to modify it all on the field at the time. And MCA looked at us universal said grand openings already published, we can’t push the date, you need to figure out a way to accelerate it, go figure out your acceleration plan. So part of the acceleration plan was brought my dad in on the job side as the acceleration superintendent, which was just fun, from my standpoint, because I get to see from his mindset how to take a job and push it to the envelope to make it happen quickly. And do done. Right. So that was one last ones I got the bill with him. And just it was a fun experience.

Forrest Cole
So it it goes without saying that your father was very influential in your lives, you know, but what were some of the values that your father taught you in construction.

David Condreay
Brings me to a story when we were we were doing a he was doing a job there was a what kind of store it was that was it was during Thanksgiving

Daniel Condreay
Circuit City

David Condreay
Circuit City but it was a previous background Acron. Yeah, anyway, he was doing that job did tore off half the roof over there for replacement of the RTU is up on the roof. And then the roofing removed and and there was a adjacent stores that were actually protruded into the store. And they couldn’t get damaged because they were they were owned by somebody else. And this is on the the weekend of Thanksgiving, a big rainstorm came in. He didn’t have anybody that would show up to the job to help them to none of the laborers or anybody else would show up. And he asked us if we give him a hand at the job site tarping the roof so we went up there it was a Wednesday night I believe and we had to give up on the roof and flashlights in tar ball in the existing art to use there’s open holes we’re trying to walk around in the dark and and put Henry’s tar all over this stuff to try to mitigate water coming into the building. And we stayed there all night long with sharp facts are getting sucking up water that was coming in fixing the tarps that were on the roof they were blowing off and soaking wet in the rain. It was cold and we stayed right on through until Thanksgiving day until the storm passed and we ended up saving the other stores from getting water intrusion into them. We saved a lot of the project from getting destroyed. And we made it through

Daniel Condreay
Let me back up for a minute it was actually on Thanksgiving. And we we were sitting down to dinner when it started raining. And the three of us got up from the dinner table and went to the job. And we were there through the weekend. So and I David gone home for a few hours over there too. He came back in to relieve me as we were rotating through but we were there not only tarping but the loading dock wasn’t set up with the pumps yet and replaced him yet. So loading dock we had temporary pumps then. And then on the inside, we were making sure that we had shot back to capture any water that would manage to get through anything that we were doing with that storm. So we’re there throughout the night. And through the weekend, all three of us working through that. Dave came in with doughnuts afterwards and coffee to after you’ve had a chance to go home for a few minutes to get some sleep in between what we were there throughout the weekend working with that dedication.

David Condreay
Yeah, what that taught us was perseverance and don’t give up. And we can, you can keep going and things will work out. I mean, there was no give up or throw up your hands and walk away. You just stayed until you you conquered or get it done, you know, do whatever it takes to get it done.

Daniel Condreay
And the ownership of you know, making sure the job was taken care of, or even on a holiday like Thanksgiving over there. When you’re, you’re away from the job. Hey, if you’re, the weather’s gonna threaten the job, we were there to address it and make sure it did. He’d pushed the interior finishes your head finished displays drywall paint done on the interior of the building. And those the equipment that was on the roof that hadn’t been changed out on the roof patch, it was falling behind schedule over there. So he had to do we could mitigate it and still meet the schedule. So that was that was actually in Granada Hills actually, was that. And then I can think of another story to the as kids we did addition, the three sides of our family home. And as we’re going through, we tore off the entire Shake Shingle Roof on the house, upgraded the rafters to a handle tile. And when we go back sheeting, Dave and I, our dad turned us loose with a box of six acres, start shooting the roof up there and nailing it by hand. So we spent the day nailing off as many sheets as we could and nailing all six on the perimeter and 12 in the field. And he made sure that we understood what we’re expected to do for the nailing. We got quite a bit of sheeting down. I can’t remember this balance sheets, but we did like maybe a fraction of the back roof section over there got it she did one of my dad came home that night he came up there on the roof and inspected it looked at what we did point out a few areas where we need to add a few nails where we got a little more than six inches. By the time we get done with him looking at and inspected and he said okay, now go down in the garage, there’s a compressor and a nail gun. We’ll get that out. And I’ll show you how to use it for tomorrow. So we got to learn the value of how to do it by hand.

Forrest Cole
Sure.

Daniel Condreay
And then the value of how to do it

David Condreay
easier, easier

Forrest Cole
Easier right.

David Condreay
And that save addition that he had added on double the size of the master bedroom. He had us frame it up and Dave was doing most of the cuts on it. He had his frame it up as a gable end on it. We’ll get it all framed up and done when he came home that night and inspected looked. Good job. guys did great. Now Tara, Bart, I want to hit Mellie. So we learned a lot about just just on her own addition to the house over there a lot of different techniques, a lot of different things to do. And you know the value of doing it right.

Forrest Cole
How old were you when when you guys were doing this?

Daniel Condreay
Oh, gosh.

David Condreay
Beginning high school, I think.

Daniel Condreay
You were beginning a high school and I was in middle school.

Forrest Cole
Yeah. And that’s a lot of trust. Yeah. To put in to the both of you. Um, obviously you guys were already working in construction. Yeah, I mean, I, I remember, my dad’s a carpenter. And I remember working with him, we were doing some framing. And I was new to The Work and, you know, we were doing some framing and we were doing it by hand. And I was hitting some nails and some of the nails would go in crooked and I would just bang them into the wood and my dad saw what I was doing. And he came over and gave me it was nice about it, but came over and was like, you know, what are you doing? Like, why are you paying him into it? And I was like, you know, cocky, late teenager, no one’s gonna see it. That doesn’t matter. And he was like, you know, he taught me a valuable lesson that day. It doesn’t matter you have to have do you have to take pride in your work, you have to have integrity. You know, you have to, you know, you have to think about the quality of everything that you’re you’re doing you know, and that I always think about that. That’s that was a very valuable lesson. For me, when I really think about anything in life, right, you know, and sounds like you guys had some very valuable lessons of the same kind of thing. So one question that came to mind when you guys were telling this story. And this may be sort of out there a little bit, but why did you stay in construction? I could see where like, some sons would not want to do anything with construction. Right? If their father was like doing Do you know what I’m saying? Like some sons would be like, I don’t want anything to do with construction anymore. My dad has driven me to do this and that, I’m gonna go do this, like, what was it about construction and that, like, kept you going?

David Condreay
I mean, I like challenge Bill taking raw material and building something with it. Getting it done in a certain amount of time, achieving the unachievable or the impossible task. That’s why I stayed into it. I liked it. It’s always been fun for me. Just like the Dunn Edward job I’m on right now with Layton. No, there’s something here, you going to build a building and get a 1031 exchange with the IRS tax bill X amount of dollar value into it in 180 days. And the plans are barely finished. And they’re still changing them on the fly as you’re going. And we can’t get them because we got other COVID are still up ships off the off the coast that we can’t get the material on on the site. Yeah, that’s a challenge. It’s fun. We just did actually, we just, we just achieved that goal today. As a matter of fact, it was, I think we were supposed to have about 7.5 million work in place. And we had 9.3 As of today, incredible. So we made that goal happen. Next one is the TCO on the building, that’ll be our next goal, which I have to achieve by July 20.

Forrest Cole
Great.

David Condreay
For me, it was a little different. My dad always told me do what you want to do, do something you enjoy. Don’t do something he told me point blank, don’t go into construction unless you want to do what you enjoy and do what you want to do. When I was initially going through, going through after my degree, it was after a real estate finance degree. And I was thinking about a different career path. Ultimately, I ended up choosing to go into construction. On the management side, I just found that I enjoyed building too much. And always enjoyed it. You know, not only working with my dad, but also the fact that we were growing up we also worked out of the construction yard Dave had the opportunity to work for a while and I did too. So not only do we get to experience my dad’s jobs, we get to experience other jobs too. We’re working in the construction yard, we actually went out to different job sites and different things I was doing that while I was in college, going through after my a degree. They’d have me take a company truck to the college. And I take my classes in the morning in the afternoon, go do job runs. And sometimes I found myself where I arrived on a job site and other superintendents knew who I was and they would come and near me. So I’d find myself in the middle of the concrete for in the afternoon. Morning doing classes in the afternoon sitting there on a jobsite helping out with the concrete board. So I just got a thrill out of building and being a part of building and then afterwards, seeing things that I had a part of, and putting together and just the joy of it. And then later on, you know, my wife and kids being able to drive around and see different things that we did and even like the amusement parks, the kids got to see things that I worked on or my dad worked on or Dave worked on. As funny I sitting there in the queue line one time. There’s kids in front of us that started graffiti and on handrails. It just happened to be one of the rides that we worked on. And my wife and kids started pointing out to the kids don’t graffiti on that grandpa worked on that. So takes a little different level of ownership but it just neat to see it afterwards to what we had a part of.

I mean, I think that’s a great way to sort of I would love to talk about two specific projects. that stuck out to me. And Dan, the one is the boulder at LACMA.

Oh, levitated mass,

Forrest Cole
Levitated Mass. I wonder if you could talk about that’s, that seems like a unique project to me. Wonder if you could talk about that.

Daniel Condreay
When the boulder was moved and from the rock quarry, the route that was finally approved by all the municipalities to get through Southern California. So actually went on tour and got to be quite a thing in Southern California when I was traveling. When we got it to the site over there, LACMA set up a gantry crane to offload it and move it over to into position over the wall that was built. Basically the walkway allow you to walk underneath the boulder leading up to the time prior to the rock arriving on site we work with LACMA to develop concealing fasteners. The city required for seismic requirements, bolts to be embedded in epoxy into the boulder for seismic restraint. LACMA wanted the bolts to be nuts to be concealed within the plates, the ledger plates. So we worked up by design and mock ups for it sealing those bolts, the nuts. So if you look at the plate underneath, you wouldn’t be able to see it. We had all that ready to go. So when the rocker arrived on site, the artist came out there, one of the first things we showed him was, hey, we worked out these mock ups with Blackbaud and had Blind Five stars set up for the bowls. He said no, I want to see him. So we change that. And when he set the boulder up with the gantry crane laid it out. He decided that he wanted to rotate it from what was modeled originally and set up. So there was a ledger plate, three inch diameter or three inch thick, stainless steel ledger plate that went across on either side of the wall to hold the rock in place. When he rotated it, it ended up exposing a section on that ledger plate that was beyond where the rock was. So we wanted to cut it off. So we had a field cut a three inch stainless steel plate in the field. So I had flush out with the wall. But the overall experience working with the architect and the artists was just fun. It was neat to do and very unique to put this boulder in the middle of a campus LACMA campus over there for people to be able to see it and walk through just in one under it. Right, correct. Yeah, that was the whole point of it. In fact, the the walkway itself was and what was sporting, it was basically a matte foundation, with the walls cut off walls on either side to allow you to walk underneath the boulder that was basically looking like it was at grade, the matte section foundation that was underneath it support. It was built over the tar sands. So basically, it’s like a concrete canoe over the over the tar sands. And we actually had a specified waterproofing underneath it. So we’re rolling out pitcher thing and waterproofing over the tar, which gave us good way to cheer up the rebar. So it didn’t sink into the door.

Forrest Cole
How do you build over a tar sands? That seems kind of impossible.

Daniel Condreay
La Brea Tar Pits are right there.

Forrest Cole
Yeah.

Daniel Condreay
Yeah. So when when you exposed it, you get down to the tar sands, we rolled out Vicentina waterproofing and that gave us a stable base interest.

Forrest Cole
That’s really cool.

Daniel Condreay
The handrails were actually integrated into the port and the cast in place walls with the channel. So we had to work out a mock up of that either prove by going department and LACMA. But basically it’s a integrated channel into the wall. That’s the thickness of a handrail to use it as a handrail section. So when you’re looking down the slot, there’s no protrusions out beyond the face of the wall.

Forrest Cole
Is this a is this an art piece?

It is.

from like a particular artist.

Heizer

Heizer. Okay. Very cool. Oh, great. And Dave, what about the one project that I thought was really cool is the the YouTube studios. Okay, that you worked on? Could you talk to us about that? Yeah,

David Condreay
it was a continuation of a project originally started with Google Spruce Goose. The the original building that they built the Spruce Goose Howard used it was right there off of Jefferson Boulevard in Culver City. And one half of the building was this fuselage. The other half was built with the wings. And then they take it. Jefferson used to be a runway at one point, and they can fly in and out of it. And then they also had a railroad depot to it. Anyway, we did a reconstruct, we did the abatement and all of the seismic retrofit of the existing building. And then we build a five storey building inside of that zone structural steel. That was for Google for their corporate off This is it was about 780 feet long. And then five storeys tall so it was like a horizontal harbor I rise off in the corner of the building was this sound studios that was for a YouTube they’re going to YouTube’s was across the street and they wanted to move their, their actual studio into the, into the building. So once we were done with Google, they were occupying it, we had to come up with a way of building a scaffold system with that was basically shrink wrapped. So we can keep dust out of the main building, they can keep them functioning, and also come up with a way of acoustically keeping the noise out of there so they can, they don’t have to hear us under construction. So we took the sound blankets for the building that would be used internally within the soundstage, hung them on the scaffold system, so that we can mitigate any sound going into Google and construct at the same time. Building was built with CMU block to 20,000 square foot soundstages with an adjacent studio support building next to it. soundstages had 35,000 pound barrel trusses made out of wood from Washington. They’re all fabricated in Washington, put together in Washington bolted and they had to take them apart. So they could transport them on a tractor trailer back to the job site, then we reassemble them at the job site. Trusses were brought into the building. And between the ears because it’s a historical building, we had to set up a crane and then take the outer mast, that extension that’s usually on the front of the crane at the top of the of the gym, we took that completely off. And then we had about 10 inches between the roller on the top of it where your cable comes through, and the top of the building. So we set up a spotter at the top of the building on our on a snorkel boom, to tell us how close we were getting to the historical wood structure of the building. So that when we picked up the trusses, we could be within that 10 inch zone and set the trusses on to the CMU block and work our way out of there.

Forrest Cole
That sounds incredibly complicated.

David Condreay
It was. It was incredibley complicated.

Daniel Condreay
You should talk about your elephant doors on that project.

David Condreay
Oh yeah, the elephant doors, they are, elephant doors are basically it’s a frame that’s brought out and they have a double mat of rebar in him. It’s no different than a tilt up wall. So tilt up is a concrete wall usually pour on a slab, then you lift up. But you usually have head clearance room to lift up the tilted wall. This one we didn’t have the head clearance room. So to do the elephant doors, we’re going to have to do those afterwards, after the trusses were up, because that was our highest point of pick and work our way out of there, there would be no way to lift up these elephant doors. So we came up with a scheme to shotcrete them in place that like I said, it’s it’s like a tilt the pedal under eight inches thick, solid concrete. And they they are 2530 feet in the air. And there is a tilt up wall on rollers. So it’s just sits on a railroad track moving back and forth with acoustical fabric in the concrete, which gives you your nc 25 rating, so that you don’t hear noise between the two studios. So that by the time we’re done there, 90,000 square foot was the first time they’d ever been done it a elephant door shot being shotcreted in place worked out really well.

Forrest Cole
Yeah, that’s amazing. I mean, you know, earlier when you said you love the challenge of construction, and that’s the thing too, about construction, right is like having to develop things, develop ways that have never been done before. Because of necessity, right is really cool, right? You know, when you’re in that….

David Condreay
The projects present certain problems or, or situations to you. And you have to figure out a way to work around those problems. So we usually just sit there and strategize. I mean, we use it as a team effort. And I’ll sit there and bring everybody to the table. And we’ll sit there and talk it through and figure out ways to do it. We can do models, we can do all kinds of things to and try to mimic what we need to do to achieve that outcome. Normally, if you have a team of three people together, and we’re all equally collaborating, we can come up with a solution.

Forrest Cole
Yeah. Yeah, that’s amazing.

Daniel Condreay
And think of innovative ways to approach it and do it. Yeah. So that’s maybe one of the things that David and I both got from our dad was figuring out ways to do things that people say can’t be done. Okay, now they, that’s a challenge. Let’s see if we can figure out how to do it.

Forrest Cole
Yeah, that’s great. And as a team, right as a group of willing people.

Daniel Condreay
Well, usually when you’re sitting at a table when you get to the project team is together. Great ideas come from the collaboration with The team. Yeah, sure. Everybody starts thinking and brainstorming by the time you finish, you’re gonna find a way to do something that nobody else has thought about.

Forrest Cole
Yeah.

Daniel Condreay
…that ends up being a homerun for the project.

Yeah,because like one person says one idea. And it may not be totally there, but the next person like that inspires somebody, and it just keeps building from there. And so that process is great. Yeah. So how long have you both been with Layton?

I’ve been with Layton for about a year and a half now.

David Condreay
And I just had my first anniversary.

Forrest Cole
Oh, great. And I know that, Dan, you’re working at the Element Hotel. And Dave, your working at Dunn Edwards. But I know that you both worked on a project together in Hawaii. Is that right?

David Condreay
Yeah. We’ll tell you what was that Hotel One Hanalei Bay.

Forrest Cole
Okay. Does that the only other project you’ve worked on?

David Condreay
With Layton, yes.

Forrest Cole
With Layton? Yeah. Great.

Daniel Condreay
Myself, also the City Hope

Forrest Cole
Oh, City Hape. What project? I don’t know. I’m not familiar with that one.

Daniel Condreay
We have a hotel and roadwork project we’re doing up there infrastructure project too.

Forrest Cole
Huh? Okay. Great. Do you think there will be any studio work in Layton’s future

Daniel Condreay
Most certainly.

Forrest Cole
… or amusement amusement park work?

Daniel Condreay
Most certainly.

Forrest Cole
Maybe the next Colossus

David Condreay
Business development is really trying to get they’ve got a lot of irons in the fire.

Forrest Cole
I love it. I love it.

Daniel Condreay
They’d be fun project to do, especially in southern California.

Forrest Cole
Oh yeah, it’d be great.

Daniel Condreay
But anywhere I’d be the building studios was fun work and amusement parks are fun work.

Forrest Cole
I can imagine. So one question that’s been on my mind as we’ve been talking today, I see similarities between Layton and your family. You know, Layton is a family business. You’re a family business. And I wonder if I wonder if you see similarities between the way Layton is as a family and the way that your father and yourselves are as a if we can call you a family business?

Daniel Condreay
Well, well, the values and the ethics are there.

David Condreay
Allen Layton was in the military and he was a war veteran. So was my dad. I mean, that’s something that comes to mind. And he was a construction trying to make a business first. And living for his family working construction. Same sounded. Yeah, there’s a lot of similarities, I think, crossover between the two of us. I mean, we both Eagle Scouts. So we’re in the boy scouts, and we got our Eagle. So I mean, that’s another thing. I think those things are…

Forrest Cole
Yeah, just I mean, I, you know, as I sit here, I see, you know, I don’t know that much about the Layton history. That’s something that we want to explore more with this podcast. So I hope as we get into more episodes that will I you know, I hope what I think we’ll find some similarities, you know, but I see a lot of integrity in the stories that you tell about your father. And a lot of I hear a lot of pride about your father and in the projects. And I just, it’s really been amazing to listen to your stories. And I thank you for your time and for sharing everything that you have with us today. So thank you very much. Appreciate it.

David Condreay
Your’e welcome.

Daniel Condreay
Thank you.

Forrest Cole
I had a great time chatting with the Condreay brothers, and thank you David and Daniel for joining me. Thanks for listening to Laying the Groundwork. This is Forrest Cole. And we look forward to having you along while we discover the history and build the present and Layton Construction. See you next time.